Security Alerts & News
by Tymoteusz A. Góral

History
#1566 Odinaff Trojan attacks banks and more, monitoring networks and stealing credentials
A previously undocumented banking Trojan is targeting financial institutions across the globe and is being used by cybercriminals to spy on networks of compromised organisations and stealthily defraud them of funds.

The Odinaff trojan has been active since January this year, carrying out attacks against organisations operating in the banking, securities, trading, and payroll sectors, as well as those which provide support services to these industries.

According to cybersecurity researchers at Symantec, the Trojan contains custom-built malware tools purposely built for exploring compromised networks, stealing credentials, and monitoring and recording employee activity in attacks which researchers say can be highly lucrative for hackers -- and bear the hallmarks of the Carbanak financial Trojan.
#1565 NSA could put undetectable “trapdoors” in millions of crypto keys
Researchers have devised a way to place undetectable backdoors in the cryptographic keys that protect websites, virtual private networks, and Internet servers. The feat allows hackers to passively decrypt hundreds of millions of encrypted communications as well as cryptographically impersonate key owners.

The technique is notable because it puts a backdoor—or in the parlance of cryptographers, a "trapdoor"—in 1,024-bit keys used in the Diffie-Hellman key exchange. Diffie-Hellman significantly raises the burden on eavesdroppers because it regularly changes the encryption key protecting an ongoing communication. Attackers who are aware of the trapdoor have everything they need to decrypt Diffie-Hellman-protected communications over extended periods of time, often measured in years. Knowledgeable attackers can also forge cryptographic signatures that are based on the widely used digital signature algorithm
#1564 Ransomware: Expert advice on how to keep safe and secure
On the one hand, ransomware can be extremely scary – the encrypted files can essentially be considered damaged and beyond repair. But if you have properly prepared your system, it is really nothing more than a nuisance.

There are a few things that you can do to keep ransomware from wrecking your day. Let’s start with what can be done in advance to help prevent malware from getting onto your system in the first place, and to minimize damage if it does happen.
#1563 On the StrongPity waterhole attacks targeting Italian and Belgian encryption users
The StrongPity APT is a technically capable group operating under the radar for several years. The group has quietly deployed zero-day in the past, effectively spearphished targets, and maintains a modular toolset. What is most interesting about this group’s more recent activity however, is their focus on users of encryption tools, peaking this summer. In particular, the focus was on Italian and Belgian users, but the StrongPity watering holes affected systems in far more locations than just those two. Adding in their creative waterholing and poisoned installer tactics, we describe the StrongPity APT as not only determined and well-resourced, but fairly reckless and innovative as well.
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