Security Alerts & News
by Tymoteusz A. Góral

History
#1476 Facebook page takeover – zero-day vulnerability
Insecure Direct Object References occur when an application provides direct access to objects based on user-supplied input. As a result of this vulnerability attackers can bypass authorization and access resources in the system directly, for example database records or files.

Insecure Direct Object References allow attackers to bypass authorization and access resources directly by modifying the value of a parameter used to directly point to an object. Such resources can be database entries belonging to other users, files in the system, and more. This is caused by the fact that the application takes user supplied input and uses it to retrieve an object without performing sufficient authorization checks.
#1475 Blizzard hit with DDoS attack disrupting play for gamers
Blizzard Entertainment was hit with a denial-of-service attack on Sunday that knocked its Battle.net servers offline.

"We are currently monitoring a DDOS attack against network providers which is affecting latency/connections to our games," Blizzard wrote in a tweet.

Battle.net runs many of Blizzard's popular games, including Overwatch, World of Warcraft, Hearthstone: Heroes of Warcraft, and more.
#1474 IKEv1 information disclosure vulnerability in multiple Cisco products
A vulnerability in IKEv1 packet processing code in Cisco IOS, Cisco IOS XE and Cisco IOS XR Software could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to retrieve memory contents, which could lead to the disclosure of confidential information.

The vulnerability is due to insufficient condition checks in the part of the code that handles IKEv1 security negotiation requests. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by sending a crafted IKEv1 packet to an affected device configured to accept IKEv1 security negotiation requests. A successful exploit could allow the attacker to retrieve memory contents, which could lead to the disclosure of confidential information.

Cisco will release software updates that address this vulnerability. There are no workarounds that address this vulnerability.
#1473 Mozilla plans Firefox fix for same malware vulnerability that bit Tor
Mozilla officials say they'll release a Firefox update on Tuesday that fixes the same cross-platform, malicious code-execution vulnerability patched Friday in the Tor browser.

The vulnerability allows an attacker who has a man-in-the-middle position and is able to obtain a forged certificate to impersonate Mozilla servers, Tor officials warned in an advisory. From there, the attacker could deliver a malicious update for NoScript or many other Firefox extensions installed on a targeted computer. The fraudulent certificate would have to be issued by any one of several hundred Firefox-trusted certificate authorities (CA).

While it probably would be challenging to hack a CA or trick one into issuing the necessary certificate for addons.mozilla.org, such a capability is well within reach of nation-sponsored attackers, who are precisely the sort of adversaries included in the Tor threat model. In 2011, for instance, hackers tied to Iran compromised Dutch CA DigiNotar and minted counterfeit certificates for more than 200 addresses, including Gmail and the Mozilla addons subdomain.
#1472 ORWL PC: The most secure home computer ever
We’ve all heard tales of foreign intelligence entities breaking into hotel rooms and cloning a person’s hard drive while he or she is in the bar downstairs.

You might dismiss it as the stuff of urban legend or Jason Bourne movies, but this style of attack does highlight one of the most basic weaknesses of today’s PCs: Their data is extremely vulnerable once an attacker has physical access to a machine. Cold boot attacks, USB exploits,or DMA attacks over FireWire, among other breaches, are all possible if a bad actor can get his or her hands on the hardware.
#1471 Structure Security: How much security can you automate?
Security talent is hard to find and enterprises are falling over each other to hire people to defend their infrastructure, applications and data.

Meanwhile, universities are adding cybersecurity programs, but not a pace that'll make much of a dent into the talent shortage.

Can artificial intelligence and automation help the security cause?

Most likely. The security intersection between artificial intelligence, automation and the labor pool will be front and center at the Structure Security conference kicking off next Tuesday, Sept. 27. I'm moderating a talk with Jay Leek, Chief Information Security Officer at Blackstone, the massive private equity firm.
History
2017: 01 02 03 04 05
2016: 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12