Security Alerts & News
by Tymoteusz A. Góral

History
#828 Wekby APT gang using DNS tunneling for command and control
Palo Alto Networks is reporting a shift in malware tactics used by the APT group Wekby that has added a rare but effective new tool to its bag of tricks. The security firm reported on Tuesday that over the past week, Wekby attackers are turning to the technique known as DNS tunneling in lieu of more conventional HTTP delivery of command and controls for remote access control of infected computer networks.

Researchers discovered the change in strategy while monitoring an undisclosed U.S.-based high-tech firm targeted by the gang. Palo Alto Networks call the DNS tunneling malware pisloader, adding it has existed for some time but is seldom used. The use of the DNS-based attacks differs from the Wekby’s go-to malware HTTPBrowser, which is still used widely by the group, according to Ryan Olson, researcher at Palo Alto Networks Unit 42 team.
#827 Skimmers found at Walmart: a closer Look
Recent local news stories about credit card skimmers found in self-checkout lanes at some Walmart locations reminds me of a criminal sales pitch I saw recently for overlay skimmers made specifically for the very same card terminals.

Much like the skimmers found at some Safeway locations earlier this year, the skimming device pictured below was designed to be installed in the blink of an eye at self-checkout lanes — as in recent incidents at Walmart stores in Fredericksburg, Va. and Fort Wright, Ky. In these attacks, the skimmers were made to piggyback on card readers sold by payment solutions company Ingenico.
#826 APT groups finding success with patched Microsoft flaw
A Microsoft Office vulnerability patched six months ago continues to be a valuable tool for APT gangs operating primarily in Southeast Asia and the Far East.

Researchers at Kaspersky Lab today published a report describing how attackers continue to flourish exploiting CVE-2015-2545, a remote code execution vulnerability where an attacker crafts an EPS image file embedded in an Office document designed to bypass memory protections on Windows systems.

Exploits have been used primarily to gain an initial foothold on targeted systems. Those targets are largely government and diplomatic agencies and individuals in India and Asia, as well as satellite offices of those agencies in Europe and elsewhere.

The Office flaw was patched in September in MS15-099 and updated again in November. Yet APT groups seem to be capitalizing on lax patching inside these high-profile organizations to carry out espionage. Some criminal organizations have also made use of exploits against this particular flaw, in particular against financial organizations in Asia, Kaspersky researchers said in their report.
#825 Major DNS (NS1) provider hit by mysterious, focused DDoS attack
Unknown attackers have been directing an ever-changing army of bots in a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack against NS1, a major DNS and traffic management provider, for over a week. While the company has essentially shunted off much of the attack traffic, NS1 experienced some interruptions in service early last week. And the attackers have also gone after partners of NS1, interrupting service to the company's website and other services not tied to the DNS and traffic-management platform. While it's clear that the attack is targeting NS1 in particular and not one of the company's customers, there's no indication of who is behind the attacks or why they are being carried out.

NS1 CEO Kris Beevers told Ars that the attacks were yet another escalation of a trend that has been plaguing DNS and content delivery network providers since February of this year. "This varies from the painful-but-boring DDoS attacks we've seen," he said in a phone interview. "We'd seen reflection attacks [also known as DNS amplification attacks] increasing in volumes, as had a few content delivery networks we've talked to, some of whom are our customers."
#824 Scary and fascinating: The future of big data
Bernard Marr, a leading expert on big data explains how the technology will transform work.
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