Security Alerts & News
by Tymoteusz A. Góral

History
#2008 Android phone hacks could unlock millions of cars
In the era of the connected car, automakers and third-party developers compete to turn smartphones into vehicular remote controls, allowing drivers to locate, lock, and unlock their rides with a screen tap. Some apps even summon cars and trucks in Knight Rider fashion. But phones can be hacked. And when they are, those car-connected features can fall into the hands of hackers, too.

That’s the troubling result of a test of nine different connected-car Android apps from seven companies. A pair of researchers from the Russian security firm Kaspersky found that most of the apps, several of which have been downloaded hundreds of thousands or over a million times, lacked even basic software defenses that drivers might expect to protect one of their most valuable possessions. By either rooting the target phone or tricking a user into installing malicious code, the researchers say, hackers could use any of the apps Kaspersky tested to locate a car, unlock it, and in some cases start its ignition.
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#2011 IoT botnet bogs down college campus network
#2010 A glimpse into how much Google knows about Russian government hackers
#2009 Researchers discover self-healing malware that targets Magento stores
#2008 Android phone hacks could unlock millions of cars
#2007 Penetration testing tools cheat sheet
#2006 A corporate inbox receives 4.3 times more malware than a regular inbox
#2005 German parents told to destroy Cayla dolls over hacking fears
#2004 USB Killer now lets you fry most Lightning and USB-C devices for $55
#2003 Google discloses another unpatched Windows vulnerability
#2002 Permadelete: remove files securely on Windows PCs
#2001 Mongoaudit helps you secure MongoDB databases
#2000 CyberX discovers large-scale cyber-reconnaissance operation targeting Ukrainian organizations
#1999 PHP becomes first programming language to add modern cryptography library in its core
#1998 Trends in Android ransomware (PDF)
#1997 EU privacy watchdogs say Windows 10 settings still raise concerns
#1996 Lazarus’ false flag malware
History
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