Security Alerts & News
by Tymoteusz A. Góral

History
#1971 Fileless attacks against enterprise networks
During incident response, a team of security specialists needs to follow the artefacts that attackers have left in the network. Artefacts are stored in logs, memories and hard drives. Unfortunately, each of these storage media has a limited timeframe when the required data is available. One reboot of an attacked computer will make memory acquisition useless. Several months after an attack the analysis of logs becomes a gamble because they are rotated over time. Hard drives store a lot of needed data and, depending on its activity, forensic specialists may extract data up to a year after an incident. That’s why attackers are using anti-forensic techniques (or simply SDELETE) and memory-based malware to hide their activity during data acquisition. A good example of the implementation of such techniques is Duqu2. After dropping on the hard drive and starting its malicious MSI package it removes the package from the hard drive with file renaming and leaves part of itself in the memory with a payload. That’s why memory forensics is critical to the analysis of malware and its functions. Another important part of an attack are the tunnels that are going to be installed in the network by attackers. Cybercriminals (like Carbanak or GCMAN) may use PLINK for that. Duqu2 used a special driver for that. Now you may understand why we were very excited and impressed when, during an incident response, we found that memory-based malware and tunnelling were implemented by attackers using Windows standard utilities like “SC” and “NETSH“.
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#1978 Google Project Zero: How we cracked Samsung's DoD and NSA-certified Knox
#1977 AthenaGo RAT uses Tor2Web proxy system to hide C&C server
#1976 DynA-Crypt not only encrypts your files, but also steals your info
#1975 Newly discovered flaw undermines HTTPS connections for almost 1,000 sites
#1974 Finding Ticketbleed
#1973 Google let scammers post a perfectly spoofed Amazon ad in its search results
#1972 The startup paying people to legally hack Uber, Nintendo, and Starbucks just got another $40 million to keep growing
#1971 Fileless attacks against enterprise networks
#1970 Mirai gets a Windows version to boost distribution efforts
#1969 This modular backdoor malware is now the most common threat to Android smartphones
#1968 Mac malware, possibly made in Iran, targets US defense industry
History
2017: 01 02 03 04 05
2016: 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12