Security Alerts & News
by Tymoteusz A. Góral

History
#1782 Millions exposed to malvertising that hid attack code in banner pixels
Millions of people visiting mainstream websites over the past two months have been exposed to a novel form of malicious ads that embed attack code in individual pixels of the banners.

Researchers from antivirus provider Eset said "Stegano," as they've dubbed the campaign, dates back to 2014. Beginning in early October, its unusually stealthy operators scored a major coup by getting the ads displayed on a variety of unnamed reputable news sites, each with millions of daily visitors. Borrowing from the word steganography—the practice of concealing secret messages inside a larger document that dates back to at least 440 BC—Stegano hides parts of its malicious code in parameters controlling the transparency of pixels used to display banner ads. While the attack code alters the tone or color of the images, the changes are almost invisible to the untrained eye.

The malicious script is concealed in the alpha channel that defines the transparency of pixels, making it extremely difficult for even sharp-eyed ad networks to detect. After verifying that the targeted browser isn't running in a virtual machine or connected to other types of security software often used to detect attacks, the script redirects the browser to a site that hosts three exploits for now-patched Adobe Flash vulnerabilities.
Read more
#1785 Buffer overflow in BSD libc library patched
#1784 Phishing made easy: Time to rethink your prevention strategy? (PDF)
#1783 Phishing-as-a-service is making it easier than ever for hackers to steal your data
#1782 Millions exposed to malvertising that hid attack code in banner pixels
#1781 Hackers gamify DDoS attacks with collaborative platform
#1780 Critical vulnerability patched in Roundcube webmail
#1779 Backdoor accounts found in 80 Sony IP security camera models
History
2017: 01 02 03 04 05
2016: 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12